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Brazil will have daily monitoring of the impact of the Women's World Cup on the country's tourism

With Brazil guaranteed as the host country for the next edition of the Women's World Cup, in 2027, some actions to understand the impact of the competition in the country are already being taken. It is already known that ten cities will host World Cup matches: Brasília, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Fortaleza, Recife, Salvador, Cuiabá, Manaus and Porto Alegre.

For the 2027 World Cup, it will not be necessary to build new stadiums, as all the arenas that will be used to host matches in the competition were built for the men's World Cup in 2014.

Mané Garrincha Stadium will host eight games of the Women's World Cup in 2027 — Photo: Lucas Magalhães/ge.globo

Mané Garrincha Stadium will host eight games of the Women's World Cup in 2027 — Photo: Lucas Magalhães/ge.globo

This Friday, as soon as Brazil was announced as the host country, the Brazilian Agency for International Tourism Promotion (Embratur) began a process of analyzing how tourism should behave during the competition in the country.

For comparison purposes, the last edition of the Women's World Cup, held in 2023 in Australia and New Zealand, generated an estimated profit of just over R$ 560 million. In a direct cost-benefit comparison, each dollar invested by the competition organization gave a return of US$ 1.34. It is estimated that these numbers could be surpassed by Brazil in 2027.

The search for Brazil as a destination for tourists, for example, has already begun. With the definition of the host cities, monitoring will be carried out by searching for airline tickets and accommodation, in addition to monthly analysis of the generation of new jobs.

During the World Cup, the agency will also collect data regarding tourists' spending, as well as the duration of the trip to Brazil. With the end of the event, the phase of consolidating data collected before and during the World Cup will begin, ranging from the carbon footprint of flights, per capita spending in the country and general data, such as the average audience at the stadiums. .

World Cup as a tool for gender equality

Winning the right to host the next Women's World Cup was another step in the policy of using women's football as a tool for gender equality.

The country is currently adopting ways to reduce the disparity in the predominantly amateur nature of the sport in Brazil and hopes, by 2025, to use women's football to combat racism, misogyny and reduce social inequality in the country.

Corinthians is the main power in Brazilian women's football today — Photo: Jhony Inacio, Rebeca Reis and Alexandre Battibugli/Ag. Paulistão/Centauro

Corinthians is the main power in Brazilian women's football today — Photo: Jhony Inacio, Rebeca Reis and Alexandre Battibugli/Ag. Paulistão/Centauro

According to data from the Ministry of Sports, 19.2% of Brazilian athletes have a professional employment contract, compared to just 4.9% with a temporary contract and 1.2% with a training contract.

Credits: GE

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